Theme
LYNNE ASHLEY MCBRIDE
Edinburgh based performance and digital artist.

im-simply-me:

I will never not reblog this. 

(via exhibition-ism)

blue-voids:

Guy Sargent - What Lies Beneath the Surface, 2006-09

(via ellanmwebb)

Every day, just try harder. You think you’ve tried hard enough, but no. You have definitely not tried hard enough.
Overheard at The Washington Post (via washingtonpost)

(via really-shit)

likeafieldmouse:

Jim Hodges - Give More Than You Take (2014)

likeafieldmouse:

Jim Hodges - Give More Than You Take (2014)

likeafieldmouse:

Carlo Bernardini - Light Catalyst (2002)

likeafieldmouse:

Carlo Bernardini - Light Catalyst (2002)

kafkasapartment:

Summer Shower, 1921. Bolton Brown. Lithograph of an etching

kafkasapartment:

Summer Shower, 1921. Bolton Brown. Lithograph of an etching

(via ellanmwebb)

tumblropenarts:

Artist Name: Bas van Wieringen
Tumblr: http://basvanwieringen.tumblr.com/
TEXT ON A WALL, 2014. (edition of one)

tumblropenarts:

Artist Name: Bas van Wieringen

Tumblr: http://basvanwieringen.tumblr.com/

TEXT ON A WALL, 2014. (edition of one)

tumblropenarts:

"Self-Portrait", oil on board, 20"x16"

I’m a transgender artist. This piece is titled “Self-Portrait” because both figures are me. The figures on the left is me before my transition and the figure on the right is me about 5 months into my transition.

Tumblr: werjhbg.tumblr.com

tumblropenarts:

"Self-Portrait", oil on board, 20"x16"

I’m a transgender artist. This piece is titled “Self-Portrait” because both figures are me. The figures on the left is me before my transition and the figure on the right is me about 5 months into my transition.

Tumblr: werjhbg.tumblr.com

museumuesum:

Richard Long
Walking a Line in Peru, 1979
Photograph and text on board, 64 x 87.7 cm

museumuesum:

Richard Long

Walking a Line in Peru, 1979

Photograph and text on board, 64 x 87.7 cm

likeafieldmouse:

Elliott Erwitt - Segregated Water Fountains, North Carolina (1950)

likeafieldmouse:

Elliott Erwitt - Segregated Water Fountains, North Carolina (1950)

(Source: lostinparadise)

likeafieldmouse:

R. H. Quaytman - Self Portrait (2014) - Oil, silkscreen ink, gesso on wood

likeafieldmouse:

R. H. Quaytman - Self Portrait (2014) - Oil, silkscreen ink, gesso on wood

nycartscene:

Fall 2014 Editor’s PickOpens Tues, Sept 9, 6-8p:“RITE OF PASSAGE: The Early Years of Vienna Actionism, 1960 – 1966” Günter Brus, Otto Muehl, Hermann Nitsch, Rudolf SchwarzkoglerHauser & Wirth, 32 East 69th St., NYCthe first major New York City exhibition to explore, through rare paintings, collages, and photographs, the emergence of a critical 20th-century avant-garde movement. Various artistic developments in the second half of the 20th century have been influenced by a performative paradigm that emphasizes a move away from formal, static objects and toward more directly experiential, event-like, and sensorial gestures. In the early 1960s, the Vienna Actionists defined their radical style through a critique of painting, specifically that of European Art Informel and the Abstract Expressionism of the New York School. Under Austria’s Second Republic, Brus, Muehl, Nitsch, and Schwarzkogler sought out new possibilities for expression that could transcend the shadow of World War II. Motivated by material experimentation, they developed their art around radical body-centric performances through which authentic experiences of reality and incisive political statements could be directly and intensely perceived.

nycartscene:

Fall 2014 Editor’s Pick
Opens Tues, Sept 9, 6-8p:

RITE OF PASSAGE: The Early Years of Vienna Actionism, 1960 – 1966”
 Günter Brus, Otto Muehl, Hermann Nitsch, Rudolf Schwarzkogler

Hauser & Wirth, 32 East 69th St., NYC

the first major New York City exhibition to explore, through rare paintings, collages, and photographs, the emergence of a critical 20th-century avant-garde movement. Various artistic developments in the second half of the 20th century have been influenced by a performative paradigm that emphasizes a move away from formal, static objects and toward more directly experiential, event-like, and sensorial gestures. In the early 1960s, the Vienna Actionists defined their radical style through a critique of painting, specifically that of European Art Informel and the Abstract Expressionism of the New York School. Under Austria’s Second Republic, Brus, Muehl, Nitsch, and Schwarzkogler sought out new possibilities for expression that could transcend the shadow of World War II. Motivated by material experimentation, they developed their art around radical body-centric performances through which authentic experiences of reality and incisive political statements could be directly and intensely perceived.